The Locust Scene IV

September 28, 2009

The Locust-Scene IV  Artist Personal Reflections 
 In the beginning when I started studying The Locust for Scene IV it became readily apparent that it would be no easy task.  The Locust were described with “face of a man, hair of a woman, teeth of a lion, iron breastplates, golden crowns, feet like a horse and tails like scorpions.”  Beyond the face of a man and hair of a woman, I had a lot to research and will write about all of that later. 


The thing I would like to discuss now was the answer to a dilemma that had me baffled for a long time and today after visiting the “bug show” at the local Botanical Gardens, I found the answer!  Upon painting the first Locust and researching iron breastplates, since the scene was ancient, it was only appropriate that the iron breastplate had a patina of age about it.  Usually iron is rust and brass a blue-green patina. 

After making the iron breastplate and starting the rust (red-orange-brown) patina, it was much too dark for such a dark scene as the creatures were ascending from a bottomless pit or Abyss (that was also another reason the eyes of several locusts were light colors, in order to add color to an otherwise dark scene.)  My direction changed to the blue-green for patina in effort to brighten the creatures against the grey/black. 

(working images)

  As seen above, the breastplate is too blue but looks good with the black highlights of the muscular design of the breastplate.  Although I thought to change it several times, something forced me to keep it this color.  What I learned today was shocking and immediately I understood the true meaning behind the color I thought I had chosen. 

This is one of those “weird” things that have to do with the making of this painting.   What I learned today was information regarding the Emperor Scorpion; a solid black scorpion with a secret.  I was busy looking at the design and structure of the tail which is what I needed to see for the painting.  The rest of the scorpion did not matter to me because I was not using any part of it other than the tail.  The curator was talking about the scorpion’s nocturnal life and how the night vision worked to see prey. 

Emperor Scorpion (Natural Light)

   I had not really heard much of it as I was trapped deeply within the tail and its structure.  I did not see the black light flashlight the curator held above the scorpion until the curator turned it on.  The scorpion began to glow a magnificent blue-green!  It was a remarkable and powerful sight.  I knew my expression was priceless when immediately I realized the purpose of the blue-green color and its significance in the painting. 


Emperor Scorpion (Black Light)

 Not only was the blue-green the correct colors of the scorpion but also fit within the scorpion’s mission coming up and out of the bottomless pit in darkness, so the illumination of each other and to have vision in the darkness of the pit.  It is odd how the components of this painting come together.  I have learned to wait and see with the things I am not satisfied with because sooner or later the “real” meaning reveals itself.  

Take a minute to read the blog on the white horse’s original translation.  It was filly; a white filly.  Find out the difference between a plain white horse and a white filly.  What I found out about the white filly was also surprising.  See the other blogs at: 


3 Responses to “The Locust Scene IV”

  1. Tina Weiland Says:

    I have a hard time sleeping while waiting for you to post new information. This is so original and very meticulous. No where is it that I have been able to find so much information on a painting still in progress. How you are attempting to give the entire world a chance to aprticipate is wild, really wild.

  2. Fred Goins Says:

    I can see that you are an expert at your field! I love to read what you are finding out about the stones in your painting.

  3. Sandra McHenry Says:

    We had a discussion at church which the one leading the discussion was saying the locust meant modern war planes. I just couldn’t buy into that. Thanks for the input. This painting makes more sense to me.

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